The Fly Arts Center - Theater, Art Gallery & Museum
The Gallery & Gift Shop
 
A new place to discover that special accent for your home décor, find a one-of-a-kind gift for someone special, or buy truly unique wearable art. A gift registry and gift certificates are also available. The shop works with local artists and crafters to sell their work in a comfortable and convenient place.
 
The Gallery & Gift Shop is an organization operating under the Bedford County Arts Council for the following purposes:
  • To generate participation in craftwork through class instruction and or seminars
  • To provide facilities for members to exhibit and offer their products for sale in the gallery
  • To educate the public in the appreciation of fine art and craft work
 
 
 
 
 
The Bedford County Arts Council definition of a craft is "An article meeting high standards of craftsmanship, fashioned by hand, hand tools or hand-directed tools and displaying imagination, good taste and good design."
 
 
 
 
 
 
Juried Artists
We are pleased to announce artists whose work
has been juried and accepted for exhibit.
 
Amber Skeeter
Amber Skeeter
Photography & Mixed Media
Brad Shelton
Brad Shelton
Mixed Media & Pencil
Brad Shelton
Brad Shelton
Pencil
Carmen Bucka
Carmen Bucka
Photography
Carol Debaufer
Carol Debaufer
Pastels Animal Portraits
Craig Damron
Craig Damron
Pencil & Watercolor
Gina Witten
Gina Witten
Metal
Janice Glovan
Janice Glovan
Mosaics
Julie Barrett-Cataldo
Julie Barrett-Cataldo
Mixed Media
Lee Baucom
Lee Baucom
Photography
Shawna Jones
Shawna Jones
Photography
Susan Callahan
Susan Callahan
Mosaic
Susan Rodehaber
Susan Rodehaber
Pottery
Toni Vessells
Toni Vessells
Photography and Fibers
Veita Jo Hampton
Veita Jo Hampton
Photography and Pen & Ink
 ~Not Pictured~
  • Rod Cleveland: Metal
  • Vicky Carder: Wood
  • Teresa Barnes: Watercolor & Acrylic
  • Becky Shelton: Mixed Media
 
More to come....
 
Submitting Art to be Juried
We will accept fine art & craftworks from local artists for objected jury (a panel of artists who judge the artwork submitted). Artist must submit three pieces of fine art and/or craftwork. The art pieces must be available to sell in the art gallery.
Upon juried acceptance, the crafts person agrees to pay a yearly exhibitors fee of $35.00, which includes membership in the Bedford County Arts council. Exhibiting artists will be advised when and how articles will be accepted and displayed in The Bedford Art Gallery & Gift Shop.
 
Categories accepted for jury are:
  • Drawing & Painting: including mixed media
  • Photography and Computer Generated Art
  • Fiber
  • Fine Crafts
  • Ceramics
  • Metals
  • Glass
  • Wood
  • Jewelry
  • Sculpture
  • Literary
  • Leather
  • Natural Material
 
Contact:Phone: 931-580-7808, 931-703-7613, 931-684-8359
Email: bedfordcoart@att.net
 
Permanent Exhibit
In our board room are the following pieces donated by some of our most talented local artisit.
 
Fruit Painting
Fruit Painting
Lizzie Evans, Artist
Shelbyville, TN.
" The Fly"
" The Fly"
Jared Pragel, Artist
Shelbyville, TN.
"Alabama Street"
"Alabama Street"
Joe F. Hoover, Artist
Native of Shelbyville, TN.
Class of 1949, Auburn University
"Cheekwood in September"
"Cheekwood in September"
Jerry Ward, Artist
Shelbyville, TN.
Airplane Wire Sculpture
Airplane Wire Sculpture
Vannoy Streeter, Artist (1919-1998)
1965 Painting of the Year
Visual Arts Division
1965 Painting of the Year
Visual Arts Division
Venita Blevins, Artist
Abstract Figurative Metal Sculpture
Abstract Figurative Metal Sculpture
Carol Price, Artist
Shelbyville, TN.

The sculptural style is assemblage, created from scrap metal and old farm machinery using an additive technique.

The above welded metal sculpture with an inverted disc base was created using an arc welder. During this welding process, texture is created by beads of metal laid down side by side and fused to another piece of metal. A large helmet/mask is worn and one can only see the work by the light created when a metal rod touches the metal sculpture.
Abstract Figurative Metal Sculpture
Abstract Figurative Metal Sculpture
Carol Price, Artist
Shelbyville, TN.

The sculpture with a large cylinder base was created by oxygen acetylene welding. In this process, two pieces of metal are heated and fused together with a soldering rod. In addition to silver colored solder being used to fuse the pieces together, brass solder was added as part of the design. Although a welding mask is worn, the artist can see the work in progress and has more control than in arc welding.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                  
                                                                                                                                                                                                             Fred Swanton, Artwork from 1886
 
A significant example of late Middle Tennessee Victorian decorative interior painting is found on the ceiling of the Conference Room at The Fly Cultural Arts Center in Shelbyville, TN.
 
Fred Swanton, the artist responsible for the Maple Dean Farmhouse, in Flat Creek, Tennessee, is another exception to the usual anonymity of the decorative interior painter. Elizabeth Dean Crigler specified that she and her husband commissioned Fred Swanton of Buffalo, New York, to paint the interior of their new home. Upon Swanton's death, the corner's report of April 12, 1888, in the Shelbyville Gazette noted that Swanton was "a painter who has been living here for some time past." According to Crigler family tradition, Swanton came to Middle Tennessee as a former "circus painter." Interestingly, one of the most famous carousel manufacturing companies was located just outside of Buffalo in the lumber town of North Tonawanda, New York. Allan Herschell of the Tonawanda Engine & Machine Company built his first carousel between 1883 and 1884. Swanton could have worked with this company or been influenced by the carousel scene paintings
 
   Initially, Swanton's interiors paintings were identified as "primitive folk art painting." But clearly, his work belongs to the "plain painting" tradition of the nineteenth century. In 1997, one room of the Swanton art work was donated to the Bedford County Arts Council by Claude and Cynthia Young to be disassembled and reassembled in the Fly Culture Art Center Conference Room in downtown Shelbyville. The ceiling, cornice, mantel, fire screen, marbleized wainscoting, door and the door facing were removed from the house and transferred to the Fly Building where it was later reassembled. The house was razed in 1998, the same year that the art was re-mounted in the conference room at The Fly Cultural Arts Center.
 
 
 :     In 1881, Peyton S. Dean inherited a family farm near Flat Creek in Bedford County. In 1885, he conveyed portions of this land to his daughter, Elizabeth Dean (1862 -1959), and her husband, Walter Crigler. They began at once to build a house which was finished by 1886.
In 1881, Peyton S. Dean inherited a family farm near Flat Creek in Bedford County. In 1885, he conveyed portions of this land to his daughter, Elizabeth Dean (1862 -1959), and her husband, Walter Crigler. They began at once to build a house which was finished by 1886.
They commissioned Swanton to paint the ceiling, cornices, mantels, fire screens, wainscoting, doors facings in their entrance hall, bedroom, and parlor.
 : They commissioned Swanton to paint the ceiling, cornices, mantels, fire screens, wainscoting, doors facings in their entrance hall, bedroom, and parlor.
 : Centered on the ceiling is a circular gray-brown and white scrolled design painted to resemble a plaster ceiling medallion. Around it is a wide white band. Connecting this circular white band to the corners are four long triangular-shaped areas. The area in between is painted a lavender color.
Centered on the ceiling is a circular gray-brown and white scrolled design painted to resemble a plaster ceiling medallion. Around it is a wide white band. Connecting this circular white band to the corners are four long triangular-shaped areas. The area in between is painted a lavender color.
The repetitive, freehand design on the tan background is continued on the ceiling in the same manner. The artist painted brown and tan rococo-like scroll patterns on wooden cutouts applied at each of the four corners of the room. Circular landscapes including trees, hills, mountains, lakes, a bridge, and a small cottage, are painted in the center of these scrolled patterns.
 :  The repetitive, freehand design on the tan background is continued on the ceiling in the same manner. The artist painted brown and tan rococo-like scroll patterns on wooden cutouts applied at each of the four corners of the room. Circular landscapes including trees, hills, mountains, lakes, a bridge, and a small cottage, are painted in the center of these scrolled patterns.
 : Above the wainscoting and the papered walls was the Maple Dean Farmhouse's finest interior feature, the painted cornice and ceiling.  These landscapes feature trees, hillsides, mountains, a castle, and a bridge.
Above the wainscoting and the papered walls was the Maple Dean Farmhouse's finest interior feature, the painted cornice and ceiling. These landscapes feature trees, hillsides, mountains, a castle, and a bridge.
The cornice area, defined by a brown painted crown molding, is painted tan with yellow, blue, and red flowers. In the cornice are medallions with freehand landscapes on the east, south, and west walls.
 : The cornice area, defined by a brown painted crown molding, is painted tan with yellow, blue, and red flowers. In the cornice are medallions with freehand landscapes on the east, south, and west walls.
 : These landscapes feature trees, hillsides, mountains, a castle, and a bridge.
These landscapes feature trees, hillsides, mountains, a castle, and a bridge.
While the north wall did not have a cornice painting, it has two landscape paintings at the fireplace. A medallion painting on the mantel is of a lake surrounded by trees, while the firescreen below is a painted waterfall scene. Each pilaster features a bouquet of red, tan, and white flowers. Above the flowers are geometric lines designs in the Eastlake tradition.




Source: Richard Carlton Fulcher, Clipped Obituaries from the "Shelbyville Times Gazette" (Brentwood, TN: By the author, 1979), 28; Jacob G. Crigler, interview with author, May 1994, Flat Creek, TN; Shelbyville Gazette 12 April 1888; Forms of the Traveling Fairs, Carousels and Carnival Midways (New York: Abbeville Press, 1981), 102.
Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Vol. LIII, No. 1, Spring, 1994, pp 56-63, Carroll Van West.
 : While the north wall did not have a cornice painting, it has two landscape paintings at the fireplace. A medallion painting on the mantel is of a lake surrounded by trees, while the firescreen below is a painted waterfall scene. Each pilaster features a bouquet of red, tan, and white flowers. Above the flowers are geometric lines designs in the Eastlake tradition. 




Source: Richard Carlton Fulcher, Clipped Obituaries from the "Shelbyville Times Gazette" (Brentwood, TN: By the author, 1979), 28; Jacob G. Crigler, interview with author, May 1994, Flat Creek, TN; Shelbyville Gazette 12 April 1888; Forms of the Traveling Fairs, Carousels and Carnival Midways (New York: Abbeville Press, 1981), 102. 
Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Vol. LIII, No. 1, Spring, 1994, pp 56-63, Carroll Van West.